Have you registered for the MDG Colloquium 33 yet? We are looking forward to seeing you June 8th-11th at University of Windsor, Canada!
The MayDay Group is delighted to share that Action, Criticism & Theory for Music Education 20(1) is now online. This regular issue of ACT offers a variety of perspectives on issues of importance to music educators. Congratulations to authors Tom Regelski, Live Ellefsen, Gabriela Ocadiz, Will Coppola and Don Taylor, Andrew Goodrich, and Tawnya Smith for their interesting and provocative articles.
Julia Eklund Koza’s book “Destined to Fail”: Carl Seashore’s World of Eugenics, Psychology, Education, and Music has won the 2021 Outstanding Book Award conferred by the Curriculum Studies Division of the American Educational Research Association (AERA). The award will be presented at the forthcoming annual AERA meeting, which will be held this year in San Diego. For details about the award ceremony, please read below. Congratulations!
Conferences and workshops in this edition of the newsletter include the International Association for the Study of Popular Music Canada (IASPM-CA)/Working In Music Joint Conference, International Society for Music Education (ISME), LGBTQ+ Music Study Group, International Symposium on Assessment in Music Education, and MusCan 2022. There is also news on the Caribbean Music Pedagogy Workshop.
Announcements
  • MayDay Colloquium 33 – Registration now open!
  • Action, Criticism & Theory for Music Education 20(1) now online
Conferences & Calls
  • International Association for the Study of Popular Music Canada (IASPM-CA)/Working In Music Joint Conference
  • International Society for Music Education (ISME) News
  • 4th Symposium of the LGBTQ+ Music Study Group
  • 9th International Symposium on Assessment in Music Education
  • My People Tell Stories Presents: The Caribbean Music Pedagogy Workshop
  • MusCan’s 2022 Conference
Nominations & Awards
  • American Educational Research Association (AERA) Outstanding Book Award – “Destined to Fail”: Carl Seashore’s World of Eugenics, Psychology, Education, and Music by Julia Eklund Koza
  • Journal of General Music Education Call for Nominations
  • Call for 2022 National Student Essay Competitions
Position Vacancies
  • Algoma University: Music Assistant Professor (Indigenous Scholar)
  • Gettysburg College: Visiting Assistant Professor of Music Education
  • Berklee College of Music: Part-Time Music Education Faculty
  • University of Arizona: Assistant Professor of Music in Music Education and Instrumental Music (strings)
  • Drake University of Music: Visiting Professor of Music Education

Read the full newsletter: https://conta.cc/3Ksy5Dj 

ACT 21(1) is now available (April 1, 2022)

We are very happy to announce that Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, Vol. 21, Issue 1, is now online at http://act.maydaygroup.org/current-issue/. This regular issue of ACT offers a variety of perspectives on issues of importance to music educators. Please join us in extending congratulations to Tom Regelski, Live Ellefsen, Gabriela Ocadiz, Will Coppola and Don Taylor, Andrew Goodrich, and Tawnya Smith for their interesting and provocative articles. I’m sure they will join me in saying that we would love to get your feedback on this issue!

Newsletter (March 3, 2022)

Have you registered yet for MayDay Group Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching? The colloquium website and registration information is here.
Read on below for information from the International Society for Music Education (ISME) on their World Conference; a call for chapters on problem-based learning in music theory and history, and a few position vacancies.
Announcements
  • MayDay Group Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching – Update!
Conferences & Calls
  • 35th ISME World Conference taking place July 17th-22nd, 2022
  • Problem-Based Learning in Music Theory and History due Monday, April 11, 2022!
Position Vacancies
  • Fully-Funded 3-Year PhD – Live Music Now!
  • 2 Music & Minorities Research Center (MMRC) Research Positions Available
  • Visiting Assistant Professor – Lafayette College

Read the full newsletter here: https://conta.cc/3oZaeTP

Deadline Extended for MayDay Group Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching

The MayDay Group is extending the deadline for MayDay Group Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching at University of Windsor, Canada, to Monday, January 31st, 2022. We hope to see you there!


The MayDay Group invites scholars, music makers, educators, and innovators from around the globe to submit proposals to this year’s colloquium centered on the following action ideal:

TECHNOLOGY AND DIGITAL MEDIA

We critically examine ways in which humans and technologies interact, and how these interactions contribute to the development and/or destruction of forms of musical knowledge and practice.

Technologies evolve within socio-cultural contexts as responses to shifting needs and modes of encounters among humans and their surrounding environments. The use of technologies alters the very ways in which we interact, communicate, and make meaning of our world—transforming individual and collective perceptions of knowledge, truth, and justice. Yet, surrounding the creation, introduction, manipulation, and use of each technological tool is an ideological bias with the potential to induce benefits and harms. Implementation of existing and emergent technologies must be balanced with ongoing critique of the commodification of musics, teaching, and learning; inequitable distribution of and access to technological resources; and concerns about corporate power and overreach.

It is hard to imagine modern life and all aspects of music making, learning, and teaching without technology and digital media. As a field, music education has a long history of drawing extensively on literature from other disciplines—most notably philosophy, sociology, psychology, and education—but critical scholarly work from the fields of social/digital media and communications, and the implications that body of work has for music education, has, by and large, been overlooked by music education scholars.

Because the use of technologies and social media use are intersectional in both scope and nature, proposals are invited to address and/or problematize their relationship to/with music learning, teaching, making, production, and consumption. Topics may include (but are not limited to): critical theories of social media, activism, policy, identity formation, curriculum development, gender, feminist theories, class, formal institutions, community music, participatory culture, social music learning theories, and “world musics.” Priority will be given to proposals that connect critical scholarship from the fields of social media and communications with the Action Ideal on Technology and Digital Media.

Inspired by the recent publication of the Oxford Handbook on Social Media and Music Learning (edited by Janice Waldron, Stephanie Horsley, and Kari Veblen), presenters may want to consider the following questions as they craft their proposals:

  1. How have technologies and social media evolved within music learning and teaching contexts; how do they support or exploit the ways in which musicians learn and interact; how do they support (or not support) musical agency?
  2. How has the use of technologies and social media altered ways in which people musically interact, communicate, and make meaning of our world? How has it transformed perceptions of knowledge, truth, and justice?
  3. How do social media, social networking, and social network sites (SNSs) enable and support music learning in diverse contexts and what are the implications of their use for future music learning?
  4. How are issues surrounding mass self-communication, power, democracy, and identity negotiated in a networked society and what are the implications for music learning and making?
  5. How might existing and emergent technologies be implemented and balanced with ongoing critique of the commodification of musics, teaching, and learning; how might music educators address inequitable distribution of and access to such technological resources; and how might concerns about digital labour, corporate power, and overreach be addressed?
  6. How do technologies and network interconnectivity inform music learning and teaching? How can social media theories (for example, “cultures of connectivity,” connectivism, actor-network theory, interactive participation, “spreadability,” participatory culture, media ecology theory, networked individualism, networked publics) inform and frame music learning and teaching?

Presenters are encouraged to address issues and events by taking an interdisciplinary, theoretical, or philosophical approach in their analyses of trends and perceived problems, speaking as much to the wider university community and the public as to our own specialty, and to recommend Action Plans that can broaden our thinking and support a more inclusive, socially aware and informed practice of teaching and learning music in an increasingly pluralistic and diverse world community and classroom.

 

COLLOQUIUM FORMAT

Presentations—better understood at MayDay Colloquia as provocations—are designed to stimulate discussion and debate. Therefore, each presenter will be allocated 45 minutes, to include no more than 25 minutes for the presentation and no fewer than 20 minutes for discussion. Proposals that go outside the conventional scope of a provocation are encouraged. Musical engagements will also be considered. Projectors, speakers, and screens will be available, but it is completely acceptable to use no supporting technology. Presenters must register and are expected to be in attendance at the colloquium. Extenuating circumstances to in-person presentations will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Please contact the colloquium coordinator if accommodations are needed due to political or health related issues.

 

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION PROCESS

• Please submit both: a proposal of no more than 800 words (references included in word count) and an abstract of no more than 100 words as word.doc email attachments. Incomplete submissions will not be considered.

• State your name, institutional affiliation, email address, and other contact information in the body of the email only. There should be no identifiers on proposals or abstracts.

• Submit no later than January 17, 2022 January 31, 2022 to maydaygroup33@gmail.com

• Proposals will be blind reviewed and evaluated according to the following criteria: clarity of ideas, contribution to/interest for the profession, relevance and contribution to theory, and connection to the action ideal and surrounding questions.

• Notification will occur by email no later than February 28, 2022 March 14, 2022.

• If accepted, the primary presenter and any co-presenters must register for the conference no later than March 14, 2022 April 1, 2022 or forfeit their acceptance.

• Registration information will be posted on the MDG 33 Colloquium website.

• Accepted abstracts will be posted to the Colloquium website by April 1, 2022 April 15, 2022 and cannot be changed after that date.

Newsletter (December 17, 2021)

Just one month left to submit your proposal to MayDay Group Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching, co-hosted by Janice Waldron and Danielle Sirek at University of Windsor, June 8th-11th, 2022! To read the full call for proposals, please click here.
The MayDay Group is pleased to share several book announcements: Music, Leisure, Education: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives, by Roger Mantie; Rethinking Music Education and Social Change, by Alexandra Kertz-Welzel; and Music Schools: Best Teaching Practices in Primary and Secondary Schools that Educate through Music, edited by José Luis Aróstegui, Gabriel Rusinek and Antonio Fernández-Jiménez. Congratulations!
The International Society for Music Education (ISME) has announced that the conference will now be virtual, and the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) Canada Conference 2022 has extended their deadline. Included in this newsletter are calls for The Journal of Music Research Online, 4th Symposium of the LGBTQ+ Music Study Group, Developmental Science special issue on Music in Development, Decolonizing East Asia in Music Research and Pedagogy, and the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Music Education Special Interest Group Awards. For those hoping to attend the New Directions conference in 2023, please save the date.
Announcements
  • MayDay Group Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching – Proposal deadline in ONE MONTH!
  • Book Announcement – Music, Leisure, Education: Historical and Philosophical Perspectives, by Roger Mantie
  • Book Announcement – Rethinking Music Education and Social Change, by Alexandra Kertz-Welzel
  • International Society for Music Education (ISME) World Conference – now virtual
  • Book Announcement – Music Schools: Best Teaching Practices in Primary and Secondary Schools that Educate Through Music, edited by José Luis Aróstegui, Gabriel Rusinek and Antonio Fernández-Jiménez
  • New Directions Conference 2023: Play in Music Education Across the Lifespan – Save the Date!
Conferences & Calls
  • International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) Canada Conference 2022 – deadline extended!
  • Decolonizing East Asia in Music Research and Pedagogy, AMS/SMT/SEM 2022
  • The Journal of Music Research Online
  • 4th Symposium of the LGBTQ+ Music Study Group
  • Special Issue of Developmental Science on Music in Development
Nominations & Awards
  • The American Educational Research Association (AERA) – Music Education Special Interest Group Awards
Job Announcements
  • Indigenous Scholars & Black Scholars – Multiple Faculty Positions, Western University
  • Associate Professor of the Practice – Music Education (Band), University of Kansas School of Music
  • (2 Positions), Associate Director of Bands + Music Education, Associate Director of Choirs + Music Education, The University of Northern Colorado School of Music
  • Director of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion – Faculty of Music, University of Toronto
  • (4 Positions), Professor and Director of School of Music, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurism and Innovation, Vocal Ensemble Director, University of South Florida
  • Clinical Assistant Professor of Music Education, Purdue University Fort Wayne School of Music
  • Dean of the School of Music, The State University of New York

Read the full newsletter here: https://conta.cc/3s8Puv8

Newsletter (November 28, 2021)

Save the date for MayDay Group Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching, co-hosted by Janice Waldron and Danielle Sirek at University of Windsor, June 8th-11th, 2022. The MDG Colloquium 33 will engage with the following Action Ideal:
TECHNOLOGY AND DIGITAL MEDIA
We critically examine ways in which humans and technologies interact, and how these interactions contribute to the development and/or destruction of forms of musical knowledge and practice.
Technologies evolve within socio-cultural contexts as responses to shifting needs and modes of encounters among humans and their surrounding environments. The use of technologies alters the very ways in which we interact, communicate, and make meaning of our world—transforming individual and collective perceptions of knowledge, truth, and justice. Yet, surrounding the creation, introduction, manipulation, and use of each technological tool is an ideological bias with the potential to induce benefits and harms. Implementation of existing and emergent technologies must be balanced with ongoing critique of the commodification of musics, teaching, and learning; inequitable distribution of and access to technological resources; and concerns about corporate power and overreach.
Submissions are included to engage with and beyond the conference theme. Watch your inbox for the full call for proposals next week!
The MayDay Group is pleased to share that a new issue of Action, Criticism and Theory for Music Education is now online. This issue critically examines the troubling influence of neoliberalism on music education in different locales and contexts, presented in articles by Sean Robert Powell, Graham McPhail & Jeff McNeill, Vincent C. Bates, Rolando Angel-Alvarado, Bayron Gárate-González, & Isabel Quiroga-Fuentes, and Katherine M. Sadler.
The MDG is also pleased to share a book announcement for Trauma and Resilience in Music Education: Haunted Melodies, edited by MDG members Deborah Bradley and Juliet Hess. Congratulations!
Announcements
  • Save the Date! MayDay Colloquium 33: Social Media for Good or Evil in Music Learning and Teaching, University of Windsor, June 8th-11th
  • Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education 20 (3) Now Online!
  • Book Announcement – Trauma and Resilience in Music Education: Haunted Melodies, edited by Deborah Bradley & Juliet Hess
Conferences & Calls
  • Annual Conference of the Irish National Committee of the International Council for Traditional Music
  • Advancing Music and Minorities Research
  • IASPM-Canada Presents Popular Music Future Virtual Speaker Series
  • Pre-Conference Seminars – International Society for Music Education (ISME)
Job Announcements
  • Part Time Faculty, Music Education – Berklee College of Music
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education (Tenure Track) – Rutgers University, Mason Gross School of the Arts
  • Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Music, Equity and Social Justice -Western University, Don Wright Faculty of Music
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education – Lethbridge University
  • Director (Advanced Associate Professor or Professor) – The Ohio State University, School of Music
  • Tenure Track Assistant Professor of Music Education – Louisiana State University, College of Music and Dramatic Arts
  • Teaching Assistant Professor in Hip Hop/Audio Production – University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
  • Assistant Professor of Music – Swarthmore College
  • Assistant Professor in Music Education, Strings Specialist – Texas State University
Read the full newsletter here: https://conta.cc/3o33Vxb 

MDG33 Call for Proposals

#MDG33 https://mdg33.weebly.com/ 

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The MayDay Group invites scholars, music makers, educators, and innovators from around the globe to submit proposals to this year’s colloquium centered on the following action ideal:

TECHNOLOGY AND DIGITAL MEDIA

We critically examine ways in which humans and technologies interact, and how these interactions contribute to the development and/or destruction of forms of musical knowledge and practice. 

Technologies evolve within socio-cultural contexts as responses to shifting needs and modes of encounters among humans and their surrounding environments. The use of technologies alters the very ways in which we interact, communicate, and make meaning of our world—transforming individual and collective perceptions of knowledge, truth, and justice. Yet, surrounding the creation, introduction, manipulation, and use of each technological tool is an ideological bias with the potential to induce benefits and harms. Implementation of existing and emergent technologies must be balanced with ongoing critique of the commodification of musics, teaching, and learning; inequitable distribution of and access to technological resources; and concerns about corporate power and overreach.

It is hard to imagine modern life and all aspects of music making, learning, and teaching without technology and digital media. As a field, music education has a long history of drawing extensively on literature from other disciplines—most notably philosophy, sociology, psychology, and education—but critical scholarly work from the fields of social/digital media and communications, and the implications that body of work has for music education, has, by and large, been overlooked by music education scholars.

Because the use of technologies and social media use are intersectional in both scope and nature, proposals are invited to address and/or problematize their relationship to/with music learning, teaching, making, production, and consumption. Topics may include (but are not limited to): critical theories of social media, activism, policy, identity formation, curriculum development, gender, feminist theories, class, formal institutions, community music, participatory culture, social music learning theories, and “world musics.” Priority will be given to proposals that connect critical scholarship from the fields of social media and communications with the Action Ideal on Technology and Digital Media.

Inspired by the recent publication of the Oxford Handbook on Social Media and Music Learning (edited by Janice Waldron, Stephanie Horsley, and Kari Veblen), presenters may want to consider the following questions as they craft their proposals:

  1. How have technologies and social media evolved within music learning and teaching contexts; how do they support or exploit the ways in which musicians learn and interact; how do they support (or not support) musical agency?
  2. How has the use of technologies and social media altered ways in which people musically interact, communicate, and make meaning of our world? How has it transformed perceptions of knowledge, truth, and justice?
  3. How do social media, social networking, and social network sites (SNSs) enable and support music learning in diverse contexts and what are the implications of their use for future music learning?
  4. How are issues surrounding mass self-communication, power, democracy, and identity negotiated in a networked society and what are the implications for music learning and making?
  5. How might existing and emergent technologies be implemented and balanced with ongoing critique of the commodification of musics, teaching, and learning; how might music educators address inequitable distribution of and access to such technological resources; and how might concerns about digital labour, corporate power, and overreach be addressed?
  6. How do technologies and network interconnectivity inform music learning and teaching? How can social media theories (for example, “cultures of connectivity,” connectivism, actor-network theory, interactive participation, “spreadability,” participatory culture, media ecology theory, networked individualism, networked publics) inform and frame music learning and teaching?

Presenters are encouraged to address issues and events by taking an interdisciplinary, theoretical, or philosophical approach in their analyses of trends and perceived problems, speaking as much to the wider university community and the public as to our own specialty, and to recommend Action Plans that can broaden our thinking and support a more inclusive, socially aware and informed practice of teaching and learning music in an increasingly pluralistic and diverse world community and classroom.

COLLOQUIUM FORMAT
Presentations—better understood at MayDay Colloquia as provocations—are designed to stimulate discussion and debate. Therefore, each presenter will be allocated 45 minutes, to include no more than 25 minutes for the presentation and no fewer than 20 minutes for discussion. Proposals that go outside the conventional scope of a provocation are encouraged. Musical engagements will also be considered. Projectors, speakers, and screens will be available, but it is completely acceptable to use no supporting technology. Presenters must register and are expected to be in attendance at the colloquium. Extenuating circumstances to in-person presentations will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Please contact the colloquium coordinator if accommodations are needed due to political or health related issues.

PROPOSAL SUBMISSION PROCESS
• Please submit both: a proposal of no more than 800 words (references included in word count)
and an abstract of no more than 100 words as word.doc email attachments. Incomplete
submissions will not be considered.
• State your name, institutional affiliation, email address, and other contact information in the
body of the email only. There should be no identifiers on proposals or abstracts.
• Submit no later than January 17, 2022 to maydaygroup33@gmail.com
• Proposals will be blind reviewed and evaluated according to the following criteria: clarity of ideas, contribution to/interest for the profession, relevance and contribution to theory, and connection to the action ideal and surrounding questions.
• Notification will occur by email no later than February 28, 2022.
• If accepted, the primary presenter and any co-presenters must register for the conference no
later than March 14, 2022 or forfeit their acceptance.
• Registration information will be posted on the MDG 33 Colloquium website.
• Accepted abstracts will be posted to the Colloquium website by April 1, 2022 and cannot be
changed after that date.

Newsletter (September 15, 2022)

The MayDay Group is pleased to share a newsletter with you that is full of calls for proposals: Special Issues of MUSICultures, Journal of Popular Music Education, and Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts; conferences including the International Association for the Society of Popular Music (Canada and US chapters), Georgia Music Educators Conference (GMEA), New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) and Ontario Music Educators’ Association (OMEA); and book chapters for Modern Musicology and the College Classroom – Crossover, Exchange, Appropriation: Navigating Stylistic Boundaries in the Music History Classroom.

Conferences & Calls
  • MUSICultures – Special Issue on Anti-Racist Pedagogies: Meghan Forsyth, Marcia Ostashewski, and Daniel Akira Stadnicki, guest editors
  • Feminist Theory and Music Conference – deadline today!
  • Starting Over? Popular Music and Working in Music in a Post-Pandemic World – International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) Canada
  • Grooves and Movements – International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) United States
  • Modern Musicology and the College Classroom – Crossover, Exchange, Appropriation: Navigating Stylistic Boundaries in the Music History Classroom, Esther Morgan-Ellis, volume editor
  • Georgia Music Educators Association (GMEA) In-Service Conference
  • Two Special Issues of Journal of Popular Music Education: Music Technology and Popular Music Education, adam patrick bell and Leila Adu-Gilmore, guest editors; Any Sound You Can (Re) Imagine, A 25th Anniversary Special Issue, Dan Walzer, guest editor
  • 2021 New York State School Music Association (NYSSMA) Winter Conference
  • Con Fuoco 2021 – Ontario Music Educators’ Association Conference
  • Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts Special Issue on Cultural and Racial Issues
Job Announcements
  • Associate / Full Professor – Music and Music Education Program, Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Associate Professor or Professor (with tenure) in Critical Perspectives in Arts-Based Educational Research – University of British Columbia
  • Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, Music Education – Bienen School of Music, Northwestern University

Read the full newsletter here: https://conta.cc/3nuC1LP

Newsletter (August 25, 2021)

The MayDay Group is delighted to share the news of two book announcements: Trauma and Resilience in Music Education: Haunted Melodies, edited by Deb Bradley & Juliet Hess; and Action-Based Approaches in Popular Music Education, by Steve Holley, Kat Reinhert, & Zach Moir. Congratulations!
In this edition of the newsletter, you can find calls for proposals for ISME, VMEA, PMEA, TMEA, and the International Symposium on Research in Choral Singing, as well as a special issue of Intonations. For those planning to attend SMTE 2021, please note the date change.
Announcements
  • Book Announcement – Trauma and Resilience in Music Education: Haunted Melodies, edited by Deb Bradley & Juliet Hess
  • Book Announcement – Action-Based Approaches in Popular Music Education, by Steve Holley, Kat Reinhert, & Zach Moir
  • New Dates for the 2021 Symposium on Music Teacher Education
Conferences & Calls
  • International Symposium on Research in Choral Singing
  • Intonations Themed Issue – Alterations: Art, Performance, and Creation at a Time of Global Pandemic
  • International Society for Music Education – 35th ISME World Conference
  • Virginia Music Educators Association (VMEA) – Professional Development Conference
  • Pennsylvania Music Educators Association (PMEA) – 2022 Annual In-Service
  • Tennessee Music Educators Association (TMEA) – 63rd Annual Professional Development Conference
Job Announcements
  • Assistant Professor in Music Education – RTA School of Media, Ryerson University
  • Assistant Educator, School and Educator Programs in Music Education – The Metropolitan Museum of Art: New York
  • Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, Music Education – Bienen School of Music, Northwestern University
  • Adjunct Faculty, Music Education – Rider University
  • Adjunct Instructor, Music (Voice) – Cabrillo College
  • Postdoctoral Fellow – Don Wright Faculty of Music, Western University

Read the full newsletter here: https://conta.cc/3ycEMmI

Newsletter (July 22, 2021)

A new issue of Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, 20 (2), is now available online here. This issue offers an interesting and provocative range of perspectives related to concepts of democracy in music education, with articles by Lauri Väkevä, Patrick Schmidt, Cathy Benedict, and Panagiotis Kanellopoulos; and an editorial by Deb Bradley. The MayDay Group invites you to read the issue and comment on our Facebook page or on Twitter. We hope to generate some interesting discussion from the concerns raised in this issue.
The MayDay Group is pleased to share news of a book announcement for Curriculum Philosophy and Theory for Music Education Praxis, by Tom Regelski. Review copies are now available. Congratulations, Tom! There are also announcements about special issues for the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) and the International Journal of Traditional Arts; and an upcoming Hip Hop Pedagogy Workshop.
Announcements
  • Action Criticism, and Theory for Music Education 20 (2) – Now Online!
  • Book Announcement – Curriculum Philosophy and Theory for Music Education Praxis, by Tom Regelski
  • Hip Hop Music Pedagogy Workshop
Conferences & Calls
  • Special Issue: Practice Based Research – International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) Journal
  • 4th SIMM-seminar (on research on music in detention)
  • Special Issue: Social justice, human rights, and the sustainability of traditional arts – International Journal of Traditional Arts
  • Florida Music Director
Job Announcements
  • Two-Year Visiting Assistant Professor in Instrumental Music Education: Vanderbilt University
  • Music Education Instructor: University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Assistant Professor/Lecturer (Limited Term), Choral Activities: Western University, Don Wright Faculty of Music

Read the full newsletter here: https://conta.cc/2V2HWvx