Newsletter (September 16, 2019)

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The MayDay Group is delighted to announce that Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education 18.3 is now online! This special issue of ACT focuses on decolonization. With the work of Guest Editor Guillermo Rosabal-Coto, this issue is “special” in a couple of ways: first, the topic is timely and of great importance for educators world-wide. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, this issue of ACT seeks to reach beyond the English-only audience. Several of the articles accepted for this issue were originally written in either Spanish or Portuguese. Both those original versions, along with their English translations, appear in this issue. We expect that the perspectives presented by these authors will enrich ongoing dialogues about coloniality and its ongoing impact on music education.
In this newsletter, you’ll also find several calls for proposals, including ISME, CMEA, APME, and a conference on Gender, Sexuality, and Equity in Grove Music Online. Additionally, there are a number of position vacancies.

Overview

Announcements
  • ACT 18.3 now available online
  • World Music Pedagogy Workshop – Society for Ethnomusicology

 

Conferences & Calls 
  • Persons with Disabilities in Arts, Science and Education Conference
  • ISME World Conference & Pre-Conference Seminars
  • Association for Popular Music Education (APME) Conference
  • International Summit on Gender, Sexuality, and Equity in Grove Music Online **EXTENDED DEADLINE**
  • Colorado Music Educators Association (CMEA) Clinic/Conference
Position Vacancies
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education (2 positions) – Boston University
  • Assistant Professor of Choral Music Education – Florida State University
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education – University of Kansas
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education (Choral) – Southern Methodist University
  • Assistant/Associate Professor of Music Education – Illinois State University
  • Assistant Professor of Choral Music – University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education – St. Olaf College
  • Associate or Full Professor of Music Education – Northwestern University
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education – Rowan University
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education (Choral) – Shenandoah University
  • Assistant Professor or Associate Professor of Music Education – Texas State University

Read the full newsletter here: http://bit.ly/2mdUWNb

Announcement – ACT 18.3 is now live

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ACT 18.3 is now live at act.maydaygroup.org/current-issue/
This special issue of ACT focuses on decolonization. With the work of Guest Editor Guillermo Rosabal-Coto, this issue is “special” in a couple of ways: first, the topic is timely and of great importance for educators world-wide. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, this issue of ACT seeks to reach beyond the English-only audience. Several of the articles accepted for this issue were originally written in either Spanish or Portuguese. Both those original versions, along with their English translations, appear in this issue. We expect that the perspectives presented by these authors will enrich ongoing dialogues about coloniality and its ongoing impact on music education.

Newsletter (August 28, 2019)

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For those of you turning your thoughts to conferences, there are several calls for proposals in this MDG newsletter for you, including GMEA, VMEA, PMEA, the Symposium on Research in Choral Singing, the New York State School Winter Conference, and the CMS Pacific Southwest Conference. For those on the job hunt or looking for a change, there are a few position vacancies as well.

Conferences & Calls
  • Georgia Music Educators Association In-Service Conference
  • Symposium on Research in Choral Singing – American Choral Directors Association
  • Virginia Music Educators Association Professional Development Conference
  • 2020 Pennsylvania Music Educators Association (PMEA) Annual In-Service Conference
  • New York State School Music Association Winter Conference
  • College Music Society – 7th Pacific Southwest Conference, “Music and Social Justice: Issues in Diversity,
  • Sustainability, and Engagement”
Position Vacancies
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education – St. Olaf College
  • Executive Director – Feierabend Association for Music Education
  • Assistant/Associate Professor/Director of Wind Band Studies – Pennsylvania State University

Read the entire newsletter here: http://bit.ly/2HAAcr1 

Newsletter (August 8, 2019)

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This newsletter contains several important announcements, the first being that the new publication of ACT (volume 18 issue 2) now available online. ACT has also released a call for papers for the next special edition on neoliberalism which might interest many of our members. We hope that preparations for the new academic year go well for you all. Enjoy the month of August!

Newsletter Overview:
Announcements
  • Act 18.2 is now available online
  • Book Release: Teaching Music: The Urban Experience (Routledge)
Conferences & Calls
  • Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education (ACT)
  • ISME Publications Committee
  • Teaching and Learning Difficult Topics in the Music Classroom
  • International Summit on Gender, Sexuality, and Equity in Grove Music Online
  • Teaching Electronic Music (Routledge Modern Musicology in the College Classroom Series)
  • Society for Ethnomusicology Education Section – World Music Pedagogy Workshop
Position Vacancies
  • Choir Director – Delaware State University

Read the entire newsletter here: http://bit.ly/2YQ2LKR 

Announcement: Call for Papers – Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education (ACT)

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A special issue critically examining the influence of neoliberal capitalism on music education

Neoliberal capitalism is a contemporary political and economic ideology favouring free trade, privatization, minimal government influence on business, and reduced public expenditure on social services. Its influence has been cited as the engine behind rising social and economic inequality worldwide and as the basis of citizens’ loss of a sense of social responsibility in numerous world societies.  In recent years, increasing numbers of scholars have decried the influence of neoliberal capitalist ideology on education, arguing that its influence has collapsed education into training and that educational institutions have largely adopted the mission of business schools (e.g., Apple, 2011, Giroux, 2019).

Some might argue that music education has accorded with a neoliberal capitalist orientation throughout its history, insofar as music teachers have placed greater emphasis in their teaching on performances and on the creation of musical works (both as marketable products) and less on fostering students’ understanding of the cultural practices from which they emerge and the social processes they reflect.  Others maintain that education in music and “the arts” within the study of “the humanities” has served—and continues to serve—as an important balancing force in society, asserting that it promotes co-operation, collaboration, empathy, reading ability, critical analysis, and aesthetic discernment, as well as awareness of history, valuing of cultural differences, and consideration of non-conformist thinking.

With these perspectives in mind, the editors of ACT invite submissions for a special issue critically examining the influence of neoliberal capitalism on music education.

Possible questions:

  • How does the competitive market logic of neoliberal capitalism influence the teaching and assessment practices of music educators?
  • How might technologies of music lesson planning, such as backward design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005), contribute to advancing neoliberal educational thinking within music education?
  • What might be the role of music education methods, or methodolatries (Regelski, 2002), in reinforcing neoliberal thinking in students? Do they serve as balancing forces in education, and if so, how?
  • How do neoliberal capitalist notions of creativity converge with and diverge from the concepts of musical creativity espoused within the field of music education?
  • In what ways does a primary curricular focus on western art music support a neoliberal agenda? (The same question could be asked of multicultural music education, with its embrace of so-called “world music.”)
  • How might music education be envisioned in a society whose politics and economy are evolving away from the economic extremes of neoliberal capitalism and toward a more socially balanced and societally equitable alternative? What are such alternatives, and how might musicians and music educators be supporting or hindering such evolution?

Please submit your paper via e-mail no later than midnight, March 1, 2020 to the ACT Co-Editors: Dr. Deborah Bradley at debbradley42@gmail.com and Dr. Scott Goble at scott.goble@ubc.ca. Proposals will be blind reviewed and notification will be sent via email by June 1, 2020.

References

Apple, M. W. (2011). Democratic education in neoliberal and neoconservative times, International Studies in Sociology of Education, 21(1): 21-31.  DOI: 10.1080/09620214.2011.543850

Giroux, H. A. (2019). Authoritarianism and the challenge of higher education in the age of Trump.  Action, Criticism, and Theory for Music Education, 18(1): 6–25. DOI: 10.22176/act18.1.6

Regelski, T. A. (2002). On “methodolatry” and music teaching as critical and reflective praxis.  Bloomington, IN: Philosophy of Music Education Review, 10(2): 102-123. ISSN: 1543-3412

Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design. (2nd ed.). Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development. ISBN-13: 978-1416600350

Newsletter (July 17, 2019)

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Congratulations to MDG member Juliet Hess on the publication of her book, Music Education for Social Change: Constructing an Activist Music Education, as well as to MDG members David J. Elliott, Marissa Silverman, and Gary E. McPherson on their edited book The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical and Qualitative Assessment in Music Education.
The MayDay Group is also pleased to share news of the inaugural issue of theInternational Journal of Music in Early Childhood; and of a new publishing space for eBooks and eMaterials in music education, F-flat BooksF-flat Bookslaunches this month with three texts by Gareth Dylan SmithMatt Clauhs, and Sarah Gulish. There is also news below about the 2019 AES High School Audio Educators Conference, the ISME South Asia Regional Conference, and several position vacancies.
The full newsletter includes:
Announcements 

  • Book Announcement – Music Education for Social Change: Constructing an Activist Music Education, by Juliet Hess
  • Book Announcement – The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical and Qualitative Assessment in Music Education edited by David J. Elliott, Marissa Silverman, and Gary E. McPherson
  • eBooks and eMaterials Publisher Launch – F Flat Books
  • Inaugural Issue – International Journal of Music in Early Childhood
Conferences & Calls
  • 2019 AES High School Audio Educators Conference
  • The 2nd International Society for Music Education (ISME) South Asia Regional Conference
Position Vacancies
  • Assistant Professor & Director of Bands – Murray State University
  • Assistant Lecturer in Education (Music Education) – Mary Immaculate College
  • Temporary Instructor, Orchestra and String Education – Arkansas State University

 

Read the full newsletter here: http://bit.ly/2XVkEs9

MDG Discussion for Shevock’s (2019) “Waste in Popular Music Education: Rock’s Problematic Metaphor and Instrument-Making for Eco-Literacy.”

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Join us on the MDG Facebook group or our Twitter feed to engage in a discussion around Dan Shevock’s newest TOPICS publications. Dan has generously generated discussion questions to encourage conversation.


Waste in Popular Music Education: Rock’s Problematic Metaphor and Instrument-Making for Eco-Literacy

Daniel J. Shevock
Penn State Altoona & State College Friends School, PA, USA

Abstract: Popular music education can ease or worsen the waste problem. Waste refers to things with “no value,” and the Global North produces a lot of waste. Not limited to material, waste can be seen as a dominant metaphor in rock music. The guiding question for this essay is, what opportunity does rock music present for cultivating eco-literacy through music? Before we can find solutions though, we need to recognize rock’s distinctive ecological challenges. Popular music is both implicated in the challenge of waste, and can help music educators explore opportunities for resistance. In music education, qualitative research suggests instrument-making increases knowledge, interest, creativity, and builds attachment to an instrument, in addition to reducing material waste. In our field’s move to incorporate popular musics, instrument-making can be a part of eco-literate music pedagogy.

Keywords: popular music education, rock music, eco-literacy, waste, instrument-making

To access the full article via TOPICS: http://bit.ly/2NbzRQI 


Discussion questions from the author:

  1. I argue for a link between material and metaphorical waste. The root seems to be capitalism. But what is the nature of that correlation? It doesn’t seem to be a numeric relationship—e.g., 1 hr. of metaphorical waste = 1 lb. of material waste. But we produce metaphorical waste (nonmusicians, “F” grades, dropouts, passivity) as well as material waste (e-waste, plastics, CO2); and those two seem connected in some way.
  2. Rock isn’t the only wasteful or even the most consumed genre. In 2018, Rock represents 14% of album consumption, where Hip-Hop/Rap represents 21.7%, Pop 20.1%, R&B 10.6%, Latin 9.4%, County 8.7%, EDM 3.9%, and Religious 3.2% (link: https://www.statista.com/statistics/310746/share-music-album-sales-us-genre/). How is waste embedded and challenged in these other genres; and as we incorporate these genres in school music do we worsen or alleviate metaphorical waste by privileging those who have access to instruction (often suburbanites), and inhibiting those who do not?
  3. Orr conceives of eco-literacy as comprehending “interrelatedness” and cultivating an “attitude of care or stewardship.” What additional opportunities for cultivating eco-literacy through popular music education did I miss by focusing on a teaching technique (instrument-making) and teacher awareness of the “postmodern r’s”?

Newsletter (June 24, 2019)

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In this newsletter, we are pleased to announce publication of TOPICS 2019:02 by Daniel J. Shevock. There are several calls for proposals of interest, including ISME’s 34th World Conference, New Directions in Music Education, the 4th Symposium for LGBTQ Studies and Music Education, and the Symposium on Eudaimonia, Music, and Music Education. A reminder to those of you submitting proposals to the ISME Legacy Conference in Istanbul, Turkey that the deadline for submissions is July 5th, 2019.

In addition, the newsletter includes calls for papers and other submissions from:

  • New Directions in Music Education – Call for Conference Proposals (due October 1, 2019)
  • 34th World Conference International Society for Music Education – Call for Submissions (due July 5, 2019)
  • The Places and Purposes of Popular Music Education – Call for Contributions (due January 1, 2020)
  • Symposium on Eudaimonia, Music, and Music Education – Call for Submissions (due September 1, 2019)
  • Florida Music Education Association Professional Development Conference – Call for Proposals (due September 13, 2019)
  • 5th Annual Nas Nuvens – In The Clouds Virtual Conference in Music – Call for Proposals (due September 15, 2019)

Finally, this edition of the newsletter includes job opening posts at:

  • Grand Valley State University – Two Visiting Positions
  • University of New Mexico – Visiting Lecturer of Music Education (Instrumental Music)
  • Baldwin University – Interim Choral Music Education Faculty
  • Oregon State University – Instructor of Music and Director of Bands
  • Virginia Tech – Assistant Professor of Practice in Music Education
  • University of Texas-San Antonio – Instrumental Music Education (non tenure-track)

Read the entire newsletter via the following link: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102570574389&ca=e1f7d9d7-caa8-4d92-b11d-7b39874f89a3

Newsletter (May 14, 2019)

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It’s hard to believe that in just a little over a month, many of us will be gathered in Limerick, Ireland for MDG Colloquium 31! If you haven’t had a chance to register yet, click on the link.
In this edition of the newsletter, you can read the latest announcements from ISME; as well as view calls for jailbreak – musical inclusion in penal institutions and a special issue of Journal of Popular Music Education. There are also several position vacancies for those on the job hunt.
In this Edition of the MDG Newsletter, you will find:
  • Announcements
    • ISME 34th Conference and Regional Conferences
  • Conferences & Calls
    • jailbreak – musical inclusion in penal institutions
    • Journal of Popular Music Education – Special issue on Learning, Teaching and Making Popular Music Online
  • Position Vacancies
    • Visiting Assistant Professor of Instrumental Music Education – Oakland University
    • Visiting Instructor/Assistant Professor of Music Education and Voice – Ouachita Baptist University
    • Lecturer and Music Education Degree Program Coordinator (Instrumental Music Education specialist) – University of Dayton
    • Director of Symphonic Wind Ensemble – Virginia Tech

View the full newsletter here: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102570574389&ca=6441cefa-6180-4abb-9dfe-8c28017d1086

Newsletter (April 29, 2018)

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Have you registered for the MayDay Group Colloquium 31 in Limerick yet? A reminder that presenters should register no later than May 1st, 2019. The MDG Colloquium program is being finalized and should be available in the next week. For those attending the Mountain Lake Colloquium or EAS 2019, registration closes for both of these conferences on May 1st, 2019.
If you couldn’t attend the Learning Music Through Play in Out-of-School Contexts symposium, you’re in luck: the organizers have uploaded videos to their YouTube channel for home viewing.

Read on below for details about these, as well as the Editor position vacancy for Research in Music Education (RIME), calls for the inaugural issues of the International Journal of Music in Early Childhood and Musical Activism and Agency, and a position vacancy at the College of St. Scholastica.

Also in this edition on the MGD Newsletter:
Announcements
  • Mountain Lake Colloquium – Registration Closes May 1st!
  • YouTube Broadcast of Learning Music Through Play in Out-of-School Contexts
  • ISME Legacy Conference – Istanbul 2019
  • European Association for Music in Schools (EAS) 2019 – Registration deadline closes May 1!
Conferences & Calls
  • Editor Position – Research and Issues in Music Education (RIME)
  • Musical Activism and Agency: Contestations and Confluences Pre-Conference Symposium
  • Submit to Inaugural Issues of the International Journal of Music in Early Childhood (IJMEC)
Position Vacancies
  • Assistant Professor of Music Education – The College of St. Scholastica

Read the entire newsletter here: http://campaign.r20.constantcontact.com/render?m=1102570574389&ca=5c053030-071d-4e33-ab46-73dd0e687315